Author Topic: Jig weight  (Read 1745 times)

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Offline 289walleye

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Jig weight
« on: July 03, 2020, 12:24:08 PM »
Hey folks, hope you are safe and sound.
What size jigs (weight etc) do you use and does color really matter.

Cheers!
Patrick
July 9-14 CVL

Offline Jay Thomas

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Re: Jig weight
« Reply #1 on: July 03, 2020, 03:45:09 PM »
Hi Patrick,

I'll take a shot at providing a response to your inquiry even though I don't consider myself an expert at jigging for walleye.

There are variables that will impact the size of jig selected (e.g. depth of water, weight of fishing line, current, wind/waves). I vertically jig with a 6 foot rod and a light spinning reel spooled with 8/3 Crystal Fireline. I'm aware that many walleye fishermen jig with 4 or 6 pound mono. Each to their own methodology.

I'd recommend using the lightest jig that you are comfortable with getting your jig to the bottom. Consequently, the deeper you fish, chances are the heavier the jig you will choose. I tend to fish walleye mid Aug to mid Sep. During that time frame, it's fairly routine to find walleye on the bottom in 25 to 35 feet of water. For those circumstances, I usually vertically jig a 3/8 oz Knuckle Ball Zone R jig (fluorescent orange/yellow and green/white colours have produced for me). However, I also use regular Knuckle Ball jigs in sizes 1/8 oz and 1/4 oz when required. I typically use a crawler or a leech on the jig as the enticer.

Probably every walleye fisherman has his own favourite jig colour. My recommendation is to use whatever colour works.

Hope my response provides some help. Hopefully, T-Bone will respond to your inquiry - he's a jigging specialist. Have a great trip.

Jay

Offline 289walleye

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Re: Jig weight
« Reply #2 on: July 03, 2020, 03:52:05 PM »
thanks Jay.
 I am kind of the same way. Just want to get others opinions as sometimes I wonder if I could be better at matching the depth to weight ratio. I tend to use braid with fluoro leader for jigging.
I also realize that wind and chop may play a factor.

Cheers

Offline 289walleye

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Re: Jig weight
« Reply #3 on: July 03, 2020, 04:02:01 PM »
Also found this.........

Wind, current and your trolling or retrieve speed should all be taken into account when choosing a jig size. As a rough guideline, when vertical jigging with no wind or current, use 1/16- to 1/8-ounce jigs in depths of 10 feet or less; 1/8- to ¼-ounce jigs in 10 to 20 feet; and ¼- to ¾-ounce jigs in 20 to 30 feet. As wind, current or your trolling or retrieve speed increases, however, you’ll need to opt for a larger jig to get down into the strike zone.

Shank length

Short-shanked jigs work great when fishing with nose-hooked minnows. With only a small portion of the bait attached directly to the hook, the minnow can move freely and naturally when the jig is dropping or dragged on bottom. Short shanks also work well with live bait because there isn’t enough shank for the bait to get easily tangled on.

When walleye are biting short, on the other hand, use a long-shanked jig to either thread more of a minnow’s body onto the jig or to double-hook a minnow. Both methods help increase hooksets, since the business end of the hook ends up closer to the fish’s mouth. The presentation won’t have as much action as the same bait on a short-shanked jig, however. And when using live bait—especially nightcrawlers—on long-shanked jigs, the bait is more likely to get tangled.

Offline reelpro

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Re: Jig weight
« Reply #4 on: July 03, 2020, 06:59:43 PM »
Jig weight is a factor of depth you are fishing as well as what bait or plastic you are tipping jig with.

Also a factor is jigging method and fish activity, and the speed of retrieve or troll.

A general rule of thumb for walleye is the lightest jig you can get away with while still feeling contact with bottom for vertical jigging.

For casting and retrieving jigs, I find fish activity will tell you what to use, this method allows you to fan cast an area to find active fish quickly, start with a heavier jig and a fast stop and go retrieve, if fish are “on” they will hammer fast moving baits, if they are more neutral or negative a slower presentation will get bites, and a lighter jig will slow the fall in the stop.

Often plastic paddle tails work best for this style of jigging or larger 5” plastic jerk baits.

Casting jigs in weed cover is also similar usually start with heavier jigs so they “punch through” the tops of weeds and sink underneath to where the fish will be holding.

Trolling jigs, again weights will need to start heavy with a faster trolling speed and drop if a slower speed is needed.

Colour doesn’t matter as long as it’s chartreuse - LOL

In clear water natural colours work well, in dirty or stained water brighter paint colours work better.

If fish are very active plastic baits will outfish live bait, if they are neutral or negative, live bait.

Usually start with large plastics 5”-7”, 3/8-1/2 oz jigs, then reduce size if fish are not biting, to 3-4” plastics on 1/8-3/8 jigs,  then leeches on and then worms on 1/8oz,  and finally switching to floating jigs or float rigs with a half a worm dragged dead slow 3-6” off bottom when they have lockjaw.

Jig a Jo makes some great walleye jigs, very large strong hooks for larger plastics, they hold up to larger Pike and Muskie often caught using larger plastics.

GL Mike

« Last Edit: July 03, 2020, 07:07:19 PM by reelpro »
Reelpro.ca

Offline 289walleye

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Re: Jig weight
« Reply #5 on: July 04, 2020, 05:55:07 PM »
Mike
Great post. Thanks for that very informative response.
I have been chicken to use larger plastics with Kipawa walleye. Maybe I have been missing the boat. Willing to try.
Cheers
Patrick

Offline T-Bone

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Re: Jig weight
« Reply #6 on: July 06, 2020, 08:41:32 AM »
In general I believe reelpro has a good summary. I don't switch it up a lot and keep it pretty simple...at least for late-July jigging on Kipawa. On weight, anything from 1/16oz. up to 1/4oz. is plenty unless you're in some pretty heavy current. 90% of the time I'm fishing an 1/8oz. For color, I like any combo of white and pink...but I'd say pink head/white body is best; I like black and chartreuse on the jig head also with either a white or chartreuse body...that's my bread-n-butter. As for body size, I go from teeny-tiny like a Foxee or Fuzz-E grub, to 2"-4" twister tales, some 3"-4" paddle tails. I really like the B Fish N Authentx Pulse-R and Moxi bodies in the 4" size...and body size will dictate jig weight as reelpro stated.

And pound that jig. When you think you should stop pounding, pound it some more...they're there. If they don't want that presentation after pounding it like you're making corn flour from kernels, swim it...steady.

Good luck!
Embrace every moment...you only get it once

Offline Dog

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Re: Jig weight
« Reply #7 on: July 23, 2020, 04:47:59 PM »
1/8oz typically unless it's really windy and we're drift fishing then I've toss on a 1/4 or 3/8oz so I can get down near the bottom...

neon colors have always worked best for me (chartreuse, pink, or orange are my go to colors)...
One more cast...

Offline plowjock

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Re: Jig weight
« Reply #8 on: April 21, 2021, 05:31:16 PM »
Has anybody tried Black and purple Hair jigs, 1/4 oz or tried the Black Maribou jigs for walleyes.
Being a newbie and first trip coming up end of June,2021 am interested in reply.
Used to fish Bass Tournaments from 1995-2005. Used to using plastics and scent.
« Last Edit: April 22, 2021, 04:53:16 PM by plowjock »

Online Hodgey1

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Re: Jig weight
« Reply #9 on: April 21, 2021, 07:46:19 PM »
Let me start by saying “ I love jigging for Eyes at Kipawa” ! The feeding frenzies can’t be beat if you get into one. Not much in life can beat the feeling of an eye nibbling on your bait, setting the hook and then the battle . I really, really, really miss it there.

Lighter the gear the better, pole, reel, line and jigs. 99% of the time I am using the 1/8 Oz jig head, either chartreuse or black and chartreuse. Most of the time I have found the bait is all that’s needed and no body. I had to look up the Fuzzy Grub, looks interesting.  Tbone is a jigging machine and been a great jigging mentor for me, take any advise he gives.
Walleye Rock!

Offline RHYBAK

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Re: Jig weight
« Reply #10 on: April 22, 2021, 07:51:01 AM »
I just use the KISS method ( Keep It Simple Stupid)
just a 1/8 oz. jig head ( black, candy apple red, pink, plain)

leech or piece of worm.

If I'm going to get snagged, I'm not loosing a lot of money.
Be kinder than necessary, for everyone you meet is fighting some kind of battle

Offline limacharley

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Re: Jig weight
« Reply #11 on: April 22, 2021, 12:37:03 PM »
I just use the KISS method ( Keep It Simple Stupid)
just a 1/8 oz. jig head ( black, candy apple red, pink, plain)

leech or piece of worm.

If I'm going to get snagged, I'm not loosing a lot of money.

This is why I strictly use the drop shot method. Your hook is 12-18" off bottom.
I use 4 feet of 6 lb fluorocarbon.
If I snag up, all I lose is a sinker.
Everybody is a genius.
But if you judge a fish by its ability to climb a tree,
it will live its whole life believing that it is stupid.
- Albert Einstein

Offline RHYBAK

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Re: Jig weight
« Reply #12 on: April 22, 2021, 01:39:16 PM »
I just use the KISS method ( Keep It Simple Stupid)
just a 1/8 oz. jig head ( black, candy apple red, pink, plain)

leech or piece of worm.

If I'm going to get snagged, I'm not loosing a lot of money.

This is why I strictly use the drop shot method. Your hook is 12-18" off bottom.
I use 4 feet of 6 lb fluorocarbon.
If I snag up, all I lose is a sinker.

Even better
Be kinder than necessary, for everyone you meet is fighting some kind of battle